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New member

nmdn

Joined: 8-08-18

Topics: 1

Replies: 5

Posted: Fri 10th Aug 2018, 12:51pm
New member

New member

In first place let me say that I’m sorry.... I´m writing you in “rusty” English. My name is Nuno, I´m a new member of the society. I live in Portugal with my Family – my wife, 2 boys 11 and 4 years old and girl that should born in the end of the year me and my family are planning to build a section of 7,25 inch railway on our back yard. Unfortunately, despite we love trains we are not “skilled guys”, here in Portugal doesn´t exist 7,25 inch. Clubs or societies and practically nobody have interest in this of hobby. We don´t pretend to be experts in rail stock or track construction, but just have fun and use the land available in our back yard,
We own a 1200 m2 back yard where we would like to build a 7,25 inch. round circuit, but unfortunately it´s a slope ground
Having in mid that the ground isn´t flat, we are digging the tack alignment to let it as flat as we can, building than a small separator with cement bricks to lay down the track using before weed suppressing fabric.
Right now, we are making up a straight track panel in our garage that soon we hope to lay down in.
Maybe this could be a boring post, with stupid questions and problems that can be easily solved, but we need yours advises and knowledge’s.
I´m sending a photo of your back yard, can give us your opinion?
 

Replies To This Post

nmdn

Joined: 8-08-18

Topics: 1

Replies: 5

Posted: Fri 10th Aug 2018, 1:10pm

this sky view of the ground
this sky view of the ground
 

Xz

Joined: 1-01-92

Topics: 25

Replies: 318

Posted: Fri 10th Aug 2018, 10:25pm

Hi Nuno, well done! A great idea to build a railway in your garden when you have room. We have only one 'stupid' question, and that is the one you didn't ask. Ask away, someone on here will answer, or point you to the answer if it has already been asked.

Your railway does not need to be completely flat, in fact some small slopes can add interest for drivers and riders. Good luck with your project.

Bob Gray
 

Mick

Joined: 1-01-89

Topics: 9

Replies: 169

Posted: Sat 11th Aug 2018, 8:04am

Welcome to the society! I would offer two bits of advice to start with. First, as Bob says, some sloping track adds interest to the operation of a railway. Second, plan to get the largest radius of curved track you can. As you go along keep asking questions and we will do our best to help you. I've attached a photo of track laying on the level crossing at the Abbeydale Miniature Railway at my home club in Sheffield. We don't have many level parts!
Welcome to the society! I would offer two bits of advice to start with. First, as Bob says, some sloping track adds interest to the operation of a railway. Second, plan to get the largest radius of curved track you can. As you go along keep asking questions and we will do our best to help you. I've attached a photo of track laying on the level crossing at the Abbeydale Miniature Railway at my home club in Sheffield. We don't have many level parts!
 

MartynRedfearn

Joined: 1-01-94

Topics: 24

Replies: 160

Posted: Sat 11th Aug 2018, 2:36pm

Welcome to the world of 7 1/4. You need to have a little thought about what is your interest in terms of locomotives. If you are thinking mainline prototype then large curves and gentle slopes are better but with light loads you can still have decent slopes. If you are into narrow gauge then things get easier as you tighten the curves and have steeper slopes. Then there is minimal. Basically build something that is designed for you to fit in or on with short wheelbase to suit tight curves. https://m.facebook.com/groups/670581109660540We
Welcome to the world of 7 1/4. You need to have a little thought about what is your interest in terms of locomotives. If you are thinking mainline prototype then large curves and gentle slopes are better but with light loads you can still have decent slopes. If you are into narrow gauge then things get easier as you tighten the curves and have steeper slopes. Then there is minimal. Basically build something that is designed for you to fit in or on with short wheelbase to suit tight curves. https://m.facebook.com/groups/670581109660540We
 

Brian Leicester

Joined: 12-04-18

Topics: 0

Replies: 8

Posted: Wed 15th Aug 2018, 10:46pm

Welcome Nuno,
Do ask any questions you have, but if 9 people answer, you will get at least 9 different answers! That does not mean that 8 are wrong, but that there are usually different ways of doing something. You are likely to find that 2 or 3 of those answers will include a warning not to do something in a paticular way as that has been found not to work - you can learn from our mistakes. :)

Brian.
 

nmdn

Joined: 8-08-18

Topics: 1

Replies: 5

Posted: Mon 20th Aug 2018, 4:17am


Thank you for your answers. I know that I will find the society the support that I have been looking for some time.
About the progresses…Our first track panel is finished at the wine house/work shop, now we just need to take it down  and place it in the track bed. Well it could be more centered in the sleepers but it´s not bad for the first time…a beginner’s mistake

Thank you for your answers. I know that I will find the society the support that I have been looking for some time.
About the progresses…Our first track panel is finished at the wine house/work shop, now we just need to take it down and place it in the track bed. Well it could be more centered in the sleepers but it´s not bad for the first time…a beginner’s mistake

 

nmdn

Joined: 8-08-18

Topics: 1

Replies: 5

Posted: Mon 20th Aug 2018, 4:18am

This is the way that we choose to build up the track bed placed between two small walls built with cement bricks. The first section on the wall have already been placed yesterday…unfortunately the 40º outside just allowed us to place some bricks...
This is the way that we choose to build up the track bed placed between two small walls built with cement bricks. The first section on the wall have already been placed yesterday…unfortunately the 40º outside just allowed us to place some bricks...
 

nmdn

Joined: 8-08-18

Topics: 1

Replies: 5

Posted: Mon 20th Aug 2018, 7:55am

Can anybody tell me where I can buy a bending tool for 30x12 bar rail. I heaed about a Jim Crow tool and bending roller...what can you tell me about?
 

Mick

Joined: 1-01-89

Topics: 9

Replies: 169

Posted: Mon 20th Aug 2018, 8:18am

Hi again, you need a rail bending roller. I have posted a photo of one we made for flat bar some time ago on the forum but can't locate it now. However here's a photo of a roller made for Cromar White flat bottom rail which we use at Abbeydale. For rolling flat bar you don't need the two grooves, just one to fit the bar height on the front roller. A bolt at the back pulls the front roller into the rail to create the radius. A Jim Crow is only useful for adjustments where needed, not for creating complete curves, that would be real hard work and you could end up with threepenny bit rails. I hope that helps.
Hi again, you need a rail bending roller. I have posted a photo of one we made for flat bar some time ago on the forum but can't locate it now. However here's a photo of a roller made for Cromar White flat bottom rail which we use at Abbeydale. For rolling flat bar you don't need the two grooves, just one to fit the bar height on the front roller. A bolt at the back pulls the front roller into the rail to create the radius. A Jim Crow is only useful for adjustments where needed, not for creating complete curves, that would be real hard work and you could end up with threepenny bit rails. I hope that helps.
 

Mick

Joined: 1-01-89

Topics: 9

Replies: 169

Posted: Mon 20th Aug 2018, 4:20pm

Here is a drawing of a jim crow rail bender. You set it over the rail, insert a tommy bar into the hole in the screw and turn it. Then work along the rail repeating the operation each time. Hard work!
Here is a drawing of a jim crow rail bender. You set it over the rail, insert a tommy bar into the hole in the screw and turn it. Then work along the rail repeating the operation each time. Hard work!
 

nmdn

Joined: 8-08-18

Topics: 1

Replies: 5

Posted: Tue 21st Aug 2018, 1:19pm

Thank you Mick

I sent an e-mail to Cromar White this morning.

Nuno Nunes
 

HauteSaoneFrance

Joined: 2-01-14

Topics: 33

Replies: 121

Posted: Fri 2nd Nov 2018, 8:35pm

Hi Nuno I'm fairly new on here and building a garden railway at my place in Eastern France though I'm British and spend about half my time in England, I have had enormous help from Society members on many subjects even though I have Civil engineering expertise. Ask away to get all the answers you need.
 
 
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