Forum Options

« Back to Track, Signals and Infrastructure Topics

Sign In above to begin adding replies.
 

Sleeper Spacing

Adaptaman

Joined: 14-08-07

Topics: 5

Replies: 6

Posted: Sat 26th Jan 2019, 10:08am
Sleeper Spacing

Would appreciate any comments regarding the (economical) spacing of
5mm x 16mm welded ties - and hence plastic sleeper spacing - on proposed replacement 71/4-5" dual gauge track utilising 25mm x 12mm flat bar rails.
 

Replies To This Post

Mick

Joined: 1-01-89

Topics: 9

Replies: 167

Posted: Sun 27th Jan 2019, 4:50pm

A lot depends on the size of your plastic sleepers. At Abbeydale we use 40mm wide x 30mm deep plastic sleeper strip from Cromar White and cut to length. We used to have welded steel but now use 27mm flat bottom rails screwed down. With having 7¼"/5" dual gauge track we decided on a compromised sleeper spacing that looked about right for all scales that run on it, from large 7¼" narrow gauge to scale 5" so we place our sleepers at 140mm centres. The photo shows some of our track being laid when we converted from welded steel bar some ten years ago. N.B. there are some extra rails (i.e. checkrails) going in this section because this is a level crossing - it is just 7¼"/5". I hope that helps.
A lot depends on the size of your plastic sleepers. At Abbeydale we use 40mm wide x 30mm deep plastic sleeper strip from Cromar White and cut to length. We used to have welded steel but now use 27mm flat bottom rails screwed down. With having 7¼"/5" dual gauge track we decided on a compromised sleeper spacing that looked about right for all scales that run on it, from large 7¼" narrow gauge to scale 5" so we place our sleepers at 140mm centres. The photo shows some of our track being laid when we converted from welded steel bar some ten years ago. N.B. there are some extra rails (i.e. checkrails) going in this section because this is a level crossing - it is just 7¼"/5". I hope that helps.
 

Colin Edmondson

Joined: 9-08-09

Topics: 3

Replies: 93

Posted: Wed 30th Jan 2019, 7:44pm

If you use 250mm long sleeper strips at 250mm centres you need to purchase exactly half the length of strip that you do for the rails, makes the sums easy! I used 25 x 10 bar on 25 x 3 sleeper strips, but your proposed 5mm thick ones would be more durable. You need a depth of ballast equal to half the sleeper spacing for proper support, and a sharp ballast which will lock together.
 

Mick

Joined: 1-01-89

Topics: 9

Replies: 167

Posted: Wed 30th Jan 2019, 8:38pm

Following on from Colin's post, no ballast is shown in the photo I originally posted, but we use 14mm sharp washed limestone as shown in this photo.
Following on from Colin's post, no ballast is shown in the photo I originally posted, but we use 14mm sharp washed limestone as shown in this photo.
 

HauteSaoneFrance

Joined: 2-01-14

Topics: 33

Replies: 115

Posted: Fri 1st Feb 2019, 11:59am

Some early rail was 30 X 12 flat bar welded to a 300 mm long 50 X 5 flat bar at 250 mm centres, an oversize hole (8 mm) is drilled on the projecting 'ear' of the flat bar to attach a wooden sleeper which is 400 len X 80 X 22 the timber is Masaranduba very heavy and durable and chosen because I have a very large supply to hand.

The same system is used ongoing but now using Cromar White 27 mm medium steel rail. All sections including curved to a standard 30 ft radius are made up on jigs at a convenient working height in the workshop to ensure accuracy and produced as a totally finished 4 m track panel ready to lay. No working on the ground on you're knees except to connect with the fishplates.
 

Mick

Joined: 1-01-89

Topics: 9

Replies: 167

Posted: Fri 1st Feb 2019, 3:02pm

Just for clarity, our track panels are also made up in jigs on tables with pre-drilled sleepers, but for curved track where there is transition we only screw down one common rail in the jig and leave the other rails loose but still holding the panel into shape. It can then be laid on the ground and bent accurately to the radius or any transition required. Ready made curves (a bit like toy train tracks) will be a problem as there is no transition between straight and curve.
 

George Coles

Joined: 4-08-09

Topics: 25

Replies: 160

Posted: Sat 2nd Feb 2019, 11:15am

At the speeds most of us go, transition curves are possibly not essential, although they do improve the ride! I can imagine running downhill on the Abbeydale railway and hitting that level crossing and an abrupt change from straight to curve might cause some consternation to the passengers.
My own 10 1/4" TMNR is, of course, sectional track. We take great delight in hammering round that, but we don't haul many passengers ;-)
 

Magpie

Joined: 1-01-75

Topics: 0

Replies: 3

Posted: Tue 5th Feb 2019, 10:29pm

I have used 1"x 1/2" flat bar welded to 1"x 1/8" flat bar at 10" centers screwed to 2 1/2" x 2" x 17" long wood sleepers for 47 years. The only trouble with the 1/8" tie bars was when the were kept continually damp say at level crossings with wooden boards on top, then they rusted through. These days I use the metric equivalent, 25x12 rails on 25x3 ties at 254 centers. On a future extension I would be happy to use 25x10 for rails at the same sleeper spaceing.
 

Brian Leicester

Joined: 12-04-18

Topics: 0

Replies: 8

Posted: Wed 6th Feb 2019, 4:55pm

If one is making sectional track in jigs for straight and curved track panels, it is just as easy to make a pair of left and right transistion jigs with straight track for a foot or so slowly sharpening to your chosen standard radius for a foot or so at the far end.
 

Lynne L

Joined: 10-01-18

Topics: 1

Replies: 10

Posted: Fri 1st Mar 2019, 8:56pm

Here is a photo of a completed track we are building and laying at Haute Saone in France which shows our method of construction. I would also agree with Brian in saying that if possible it is always advisable to use a transition curve when entering and leaving a curve, sadly we are to constricted in space here to be able use them, as result you have to reduce speed here when entering a curved section of track, but it does mean you have to drive your engine and not just sit back with the regulator fully open.
 

Lynne L

Joined: 10-01-18

Topics: 1

Replies: 10

Posted: Fri 1st Mar 2019, 9:56pm

Well I don't know why the photo did not work first time so here we go a second time.
Well I don't know why the photo did not work first time so here we go a second time.
 
 
« Back to Track, Signals and Infrastructure Topics

Web design by Slingshot