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Steel bar

malhowlett

Joined: 4-10-12

Topics: 2

Replies: 1

Posted: Sun 17th Feb 2019, 10:14am
Steel bar

I’m thinking about using 20 x10 steel bar for a section of our 71/4 garden railway, with PNP plastic chairs and sleepers. I don’t want to weld the bar ends together so can someone please explain how to join them using a form of fishplate, and any other observations using steel bar. Many thanks
 

Replies To This Post

MartynRedfearn

Joined: 1-01-94

Topics: 22

Replies: 153

Posted: Sun 17th Feb 2019, 11:00am

At Ravensprings we use steel angle as fishplates except where we need insulation and those are 3D printed
 

BJ

Joined: 1-01-84

Topics: 1

Replies: 2

Posted: Fri 22nd Feb 2019, 11:53am

Hi we used 20x10 bar, we made flat plate fishplates with 4 holes
and bolt them on the outside of the rail, the problem we found
that the bar lifts out of the PNP plastic chairs you will have to
drill a hole for a pin through the chair and rail for a pin, every
few yards and that sleeper is bolted down to a pad
 

Colin Edmondson

Joined: 9-08-09

Topics: 3

Replies: 91

Posted: Thu 28th Feb 2019, 10:22am

This is how we did it, with M6 bolts to attach it. Don't use stainless bolts, although they last forever the electrolytic corrosion between them and the steel rail means that the bolt head will gradually sink into the rail until you can't get a spanner on it.
This is how we did it, with M6 bolts to attach it. Don't use stainless bolts, although they last forever the electrolytic corrosion between them and the steel rail means that the bolt head will gradually sink into the rail until you can't get a spanner on it.
 

johnnicholson

Joined: 1-01-77

Topics: 14

Replies: 81

Posted: Thu 28th Feb 2019, 10:54am

At Walsall many years ago the used steel bar and linked the rail joints by putting a brass pin between the ends of the 2 rails. The rail ends were drilled using a simple jig an the pin inserted when making the joint. The fishplates were then just drilled pieces of plain material.
 

Mick

Joined: 1-01-89

Topics: 9

Replies: 163

Posted: Thu 28th Feb 2019, 5:12pm

With all due respect to Colin, who is a good friend and innovative engineer, I would hesitate to use the example he has given unless the joint was supported by a sleeper directly underneath it. Any heavy vehicle passing over will cause the joint to drop and eventually fail. Also, unless the bolts are in slots milled in the rail, there is no allowance for expansion and contraction - so you might as well weld the joint rather than bolt it. Sorry Colin, but this is from experience over many years at Abbeydale. We abandoned flat bar some years ago - apart from some yard tracks - and now use Cromar White flat bottom rail on plastic sleepers with correct shaped and slotted fishplates.
 

Peter Beevers

Joined: 9-10-01

Topics: 4

Replies: 154

Posted: Fri 1st Mar 2019, 3:53pm

I'd echo Mick's comments 100%. Not supporting the joint is asking for trouble, as is not having an expansion gap and a way for the rail ends to move. We get fishplates laser cut with slots (rather than simple holes) for expansion.
 

Lynne L

Joined: 10-01-18

Topics: 1

Replies: 8

Posted: Fri 1st Mar 2019, 8:16pm

Here at Haute Saone in France we have used Cromar White flat bottom rail which is welded to 50 x 5 mm steel bar which is turn screwed to hard wood sleepers. The completed track panels are then joined together using laser cut fishplates. To allow for expansion in the rail, the rail ends are drilled with 8.5 mm holes with 6 mm laser cut slots in the fishplates and bolted together using 5 mm bolts. This may seem a bit of an unusual combination, but it has worked well for us with no problems with expansion during the summer months with temperatures of over 40 degrees centigrade and -10 or below in the winter and we must have about something the region of 150 M laid to date. Originally it was intended to use 12 x 30 steel bar for the track and we have about 50M of it laid in the shed and yard area, but once again we have used laser cut fishplates with slots to allow for expansion.
 

BJ

Joined: 1-01-84

Topics: 1

Replies: 2

Posted: Sun 3rd Mar 2019, 3:23pm

Here at bridgend we slotted the fishplates and placed a sleeper under the joint, we found that the joint will drop if you don't The 6mm stainless bolts with nyloc nuts which are left slack for expansion
 
 
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